Android Go isn’t a big deal, and that makes it an incredibly powerful and meaningful change for Android users everywhere.

You may know this well-known idiom: fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me. Such a phrase can be applied to many circumstances, but it also works in the context of Google’s salvo into the world of unifying the experience of budget smartphones, Android One.

One is the loneliest number

Android One was unveiled in 2014 as a way for hardware manufacturers to spend less time building custom software, and assigning expensive engineers to update that software, by putting the onus on Google to keep those phones updated. But Android One floundered soon after its launch, since the Indian companies Google partnered with on the project didn’t put nearly as much marketing muscle behind those phones as the ones they could profitably customize to their hearts’ content.

By the time Google fixed Android One’s biggest problems, its partners were recreating its best features for less money.

And while Google rectified the problem a year later with the second generation of Android One devices, by that time the likes of Xiaomi, Vivo, Oppo and Lenovo were mimicking the positive aspects of Google’s enterprise while simultaneously undercutting them on the hardware, leaving Android One to flounder. It had some success in countries like Turkey, Japan, Indonesia and Portugal, but by the end of 2016 it was clear Google’s partners were on the verge of abandoning their low-cost Android One strategy. Google learned that, especially in the low-end smartphone space, hardware vendors want Android, not Google’s Android, spurned by the very companies it wooed just a couple years earlier.

Along comes Go

Now we’re hearing about Android Go, and how it’s also going to revolutionize the Android experience for people who are just about to buy their first smartphone, or have limited budgets in developing regions where their phone is perhaps their only computer. And while we’ve heard this before, Google’s latest salvo for “the next billion” actually makes a lot of sense. Here’s how it breaks down:

Android O and beyond will be optimized for devices with 1GB of RAM and under. These days, that’s a number that often gets derided as too little, especially for a memory-hungry OS like Android, but the foundations have been in place since Project Svelte debuted back in 2012 with Jelly Bean. Google is taking things even further by separating parts of the operating system that can be pared down. At this point, Android — Google’s Android — is as lean as it’s ever been, and with advancements in battery optimization and app caching, Android O should run well on almost any piece of hardware.
Google is optimizing its own apps — YouTube, Gboard, Chrome — to use as little mobile data – Source